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British Tourists Ask Their Embassies for Help with the Weirdest Things

British Tourists Ask Their Embassies for Help with the Weirdest Things


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Restaurant and romance help is the least of it

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United Kingdom Passport

When Britain's Foreign Secretary William Hague announced the U.K.'s plans to help diplomat response in foreign countries on Wednesday, he also spilled a couple interesting tidbits about what crazy calls the U.K. foreign embassies get.

Not only do travelling Brits call them for help with ants in a Florida rental home, but they even call for Christmas lunch recommendations in Spain, help with erecting a chicken coop in Greece, and directions after satellite navigation systems fail, the AP reports.

"Our commitment to good relations with our neighbors does not, I am afraid, extend to translating 'I love you' into Hungarian, as we were asked to do by one love-struck British tourist," Hague said.

Sigh. It seems true love is just another "ludicrous request" for the British government.


What are British values? You asked Google – here’s the answer

V alues. The eternal principles on which our sense of self depends. The moral code that runs through our character like words in a stick of rock. The standards of behaviour that have stood the test of time.

If that sounds like a crowd-pleasing conference speech, the kind politicians give to make party members go all misty-eyed, it certainly could be. It’s also a load of rubbish.

Think of how differently your great-grandparents, if they lived in Britain, looked at the world. Think of how a Victorian gentleman would have thought about morality, and Britain’s role as a global power. Go back another 300 years. What was more important, freedom or virtue? Obedience before God or the right of every person to fulfil their potential? Equality or hierarchy?

British values are necessarily a work in progress. Defining them is in fact about setting out how we want to be now, or what we could achieve if we put our minds to it. They’re up for grabs, subject to change, very much part of politics.

The government has said that schoolchildren in England should be taught “fundamental British values” which it describes as “democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs”. And then there are hidden values – the ones we might not immediately perceive, but which govern our behaviour in important ways. I’ve made a little list, incomplete and up for debate. But let’s see how we score, and where there’s room for improvement.


What are British values? You asked Google – here’s the answer

V alues. The eternal principles on which our sense of self depends. The moral code that runs through our character like words in a stick of rock. The standards of behaviour that have stood the test of time.

If that sounds like a crowd-pleasing conference speech, the kind politicians give to make party members go all misty-eyed, it certainly could be. It’s also a load of rubbish.

Think of how differently your great-grandparents, if they lived in Britain, looked at the world. Think of how a Victorian gentleman would have thought about morality, and Britain’s role as a global power. Go back another 300 years. What was more important, freedom or virtue? Obedience before God or the right of every person to fulfil their potential? Equality or hierarchy?

British values are necessarily a work in progress. Defining them is in fact about setting out how we want to be now, or what we could achieve if we put our minds to it. They’re up for grabs, subject to change, very much part of politics.

The government has said that schoolchildren in England should be taught “fundamental British values” which it describes as “democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs”. And then there are hidden values – the ones we might not immediately perceive, but which govern our behaviour in important ways. I’ve made a little list, incomplete and up for debate. But let’s see how we score, and where there’s room for improvement.


What are British values? You asked Google – here’s the answer

V alues. The eternal principles on which our sense of self depends. The moral code that runs through our character like words in a stick of rock. The standards of behaviour that have stood the test of time.

If that sounds like a crowd-pleasing conference speech, the kind politicians give to make party members go all misty-eyed, it certainly could be. It’s also a load of rubbish.

Think of how differently your great-grandparents, if they lived in Britain, looked at the world. Think of how a Victorian gentleman would have thought about morality, and Britain’s role as a global power. Go back another 300 years. What was more important, freedom or virtue? Obedience before God or the right of every person to fulfil their potential? Equality or hierarchy?

British values are necessarily a work in progress. Defining them is in fact about setting out how we want to be now, or what we could achieve if we put our minds to it. They’re up for grabs, subject to change, very much part of politics.

The government has said that schoolchildren in England should be taught “fundamental British values” which it describes as “democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs”. And then there are hidden values – the ones we might not immediately perceive, but which govern our behaviour in important ways. I’ve made a little list, incomplete and up for debate. But let’s see how we score, and where there’s room for improvement.


What are British values? You asked Google – here’s the answer

V alues. The eternal principles on which our sense of self depends. The moral code that runs through our character like words in a stick of rock. The standards of behaviour that have stood the test of time.

If that sounds like a crowd-pleasing conference speech, the kind politicians give to make party members go all misty-eyed, it certainly could be. It’s also a load of rubbish.

Think of how differently your great-grandparents, if they lived in Britain, looked at the world. Think of how a Victorian gentleman would have thought about morality, and Britain’s role as a global power. Go back another 300 years. What was more important, freedom or virtue? Obedience before God or the right of every person to fulfil their potential? Equality or hierarchy?

British values are necessarily a work in progress. Defining them is in fact about setting out how we want to be now, or what we could achieve if we put our minds to it. They’re up for grabs, subject to change, very much part of politics.

The government has said that schoolchildren in England should be taught “fundamental British values” which it describes as “democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs”. And then there are hidden values – the ones we might not immediately perceive, but which govern our behaviour in important ways. I’ve made a little list, incomplete and up for debate. But let’s see how we score, and where there’s room for improvement.


What are British values? You asked Google – here’s the answer

V alues. The eternal principles on which our sense of self depends. The moral code that runs through our character like words in a stick of rock. The standards of behaviour that have stood the test of time.

If that sounds like a crowd-pleasing conference speech, the kind politicians give to make party members go all misty-eyed, it certainly could be. It’s also a load of rubbish.

Think of how differently your great-grandparents, if they lived in Britain, looked at the world. Think of how a Victorian gentleman would have thought about morality, and Britain’s role as a global power. Go back another 300 years. What was more important, freedom or virtue? Obedience before God or the right of every person to fulfil their potential? Equality or hierarchy?

British values are necessarily a work in progress. Defining them is in fact about setting out how we want to be now, or what we could achieve if we put our minds to it. They’re up for grabs, subject to change, very much part of politics.

The government has said that schoolchildren in England should be taught “fundamental British values” which it describes as “democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs”. And then there are hidden values – the ones we might not immediately perceive, but which govern our behaviour in important ways. I’ve made a little list, incomplete and up for debate. But let’s see how we score, and where there’s room for improvement.


What are British values? You asked Google – here’s the answer

V alues. The eternal principles on which our sense of self depends. The moral code that runs through our character like words in a stick of rock. The standards of behaviour that have stood the test of time.

If that sounds like a crowd-pleasing conference speech, the kind politicians give to make party members go all misty-eyed, it certainly could be. It’s also a load of rubbish.

Think of how differently your great-grandparents, if they lived in Britain, looked at the world. Think of how a Victorian gentleman would have thought about morality, and Britain’s role as a global power. Go back another 300 years. What was more important, freedom or virtue? Obedience before God or the right of every person to fulfil their potential? Equality or hierarchy?

British values are necessarily a work in progress. Defining them is in fact about setting out how we want to be now, or what we could achieve if we put our minds to it. They’re up for grabs, subject to change, very much part of politics.

The government has said that schoolchildren in England should be taught “fundamental British values” which it describes as “democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs”. And then there are hidden values – the ones we might not immediately perceive, but which govern our behaviour in important ways. I’ve made a little list, incomplete and up for debate. But let’s see how we score, and where there’s room for improvement.


What are British values? You asked Google – here’s the answer

V alues. The eternal principles on which our sense of self depends. The moral code that runs through our character like words in a stick of rock. The standards of behaviour that have stood the test of time.

If that sounds like a crowd-pleasing conference speech, the kind politicians give to make party members go all misty-eyed, it certainly could be. It’s also a load of rubbish.

Think of how differently your great-grandparents, if they lived in Britain, looked at the world. Think of how a Victorian gentleman would have thought about morality, and Britain’s role as a global power. Go back another 300 years. What was more important, freedom or virtue? Obedience before God or the right of every person to fulfil their potential? Equality or hierarchy?

British values are necessarily a work in progress. Defining them is in fact about setting out how we want to be now, or what we could achieve if we put our minds to it. They’re up for grabs, subject to change, very much part of politics.

The government has said that schoolchildren in England should be taught “fundamental British values” which it describes as “democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs”. And then there are hidden values – the ones we might not immediately perceive, but which govern our behaviour in important ways. I’ve made a little list, incomplete and up for debate. But let’s see how we score, and where there’s room for improvement.


What are British values? You asked Google – here’s the answer

V alues. The eternal principles on which our sense of self depends. The moral code that runs through our character like words in a stick of rock. The standards of behaviour that have stood the test of time.

If that sounds like a crowd-pleasing conference speech, the kind politicians give to make party members go all misty-eyed, it certainly could be. It’s also a load of rubbish.

Think of how differently your great-grandparents, if they lived in Britain, looked at the world. Think of how a Victorian gentleman would have thought about morality, and Britain’s role as a global power. Go back another 300 years. What was more important, freedom or virtue? Obedience before God or the right of every person to fulfil their potential? Equality or hierarchy?

British values are necessarily a work in progress. Defining them is in fact about setting out how we want to be now, or what we could achieve if we put our minds to it. They’re up for grabs, subject to change, very much part of politics.

The government has said that schoolchildren in England should be taught “fundamental British values” which it describes as “democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs”. And then there are hidden values – the ones we might not immediately perceive, but which govern our behaviour in important ways. I’ve made a little list, incomplete and up for debate. But let’s see how we score, and where there’s room for improvement.


What are British values? You asked Google – here’s the answer

V alues. The eternal principles on which our sense of self depends. The moral code that runs through our character like words in a stick of rock. The standards of behaviour that have stood the test of time.

If that sounds like a crowd-pleasing conference speech, the kind politicians give to make party members go all misty-eyed, it certainly could be. It’s also a load of rubbish.

Think of how differently your great-grandparents, if they lived in Britain, looked at the world. Think of how a Victorian gentleman would have thought about morality, and Britain’s role as a global power. Go back another 300 years. What was more important, freedom or virtue? Obedience before God or the right of every person to fulfil their potential? Equality or hierarchy?

British values are necessarily a work in progress. Defining them is in fact about setting out how we want to be now, or what we could achieve if we put our minds to it. They’re up for grabs, subject to change, very much part of politics.

The government has said that schoolchildren in England should be taught “fundamental British values” which it describes as “democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs”. And then there are hidden values – the ones we might not immediately perceive, but which govern our behaviour in important ways. I’ve made a little list, incomplete and up for debate. But let’s see how we score, and where there’s room for improvement.


What are British values? You asked Google – here’s the answer

V alues. The eternal principles on which our sense of self depends. The moral code that runs through our character like words in a stick of rock. The standards of behaviour that have stood the test of time.

If that sounds like a crowd-pleasing conference speech, the kind politicians give to make party members go all misty-eyed, it certainly could be. It’s also a load of rubbish.

Think of how differently your great-grandparents, if they lived in Britain, looked at the world. Think of how a Victorian gentleman would have thought about morality, and Britain’s role as a global power. Go back another 300 years. What was more important, freedom or virtue? Obedience before God or the right of every person to fulfil their potential? Equality or hierarchy?

British values are necessarily a work in progress. Defining them is in fact about setting out how we want to be now, or what we could achieve if we put our minds to it. They’re up for grabs, subject to change, very much part of politics.

The government has said that schoolchildren in England should be taught “fundamental British values” which it describes as “democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs”. And then there are hidden values – the ones we might not immediately perceive, but which govern our behaviour in important ways. I’ve made a little list, incomplete and up for debate. But let’s see how we score, and where there’s room for improvement.


Watch the video: 20 Weird things ONLY British people do! (July 2022).


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