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5 Tips for Surviving the Airport During Thanksgiving Slideshow

5 Tips for Surviving the Airport During Thanksgiving Slideshow


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1. Pack snacks

Airport food can be expensive, so pack snacks ahead of time to help you get through the long waits at the gate. If you are trying to watch what you eat before the Thanksgiving feasting begins, packing your own snacks is especially important. Airports mostly have junk food options available, and the few healthier options are usually especially expensive.

2. Stay hydrated

Traveling during the holidays is particularly exhausting, so to stay healthy and alert, make sure you keep yourself hydrated with plenty of water. It is important to note that filled water bottles are not allowed through security, so either buy a bottle once you’re through, or bring an empty one to fill up yourself.

3. Be aware of what you can’t bring on planes

If you plan on bringing food to wherever you are celebrating Thanksgiving, be aware of the restrictions for what you can bring in a carry on. Certain items are restricted, and the policies can change frequently, so check the TSA’s list of items that should be shipped ahead of time. Traditional Thanksgiving items like cranberry sauce, gravy, or even a bottle of wine are not allowed in your carry-on.

4. Avoid caffeine

Although stopping at the coffee shop in the terminal may be tempting, try to avoid caffeine if you plan on sleeping for longer flights. The holidays are a tiring time, and that combined with traveling, can leave you exhausted. Avoid caffeine to try and allow yourself to relax and rest on the flight.

5. Consider buying chewing gum for the flight

Before taking off, consider bying a pack of gum for the plane. Not only will you have fresh breath, but chewing gum will prevent your ears from popping due to changes in pressure.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


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